Monthly Archives: October 2016

Questions I Want You To Ask Me About LASIK (Part One)

Focus on letters I and C.  Eye chart and glasses.I spend most of my day talking with patients about their vision; how to protect it and make it better. It’s what I love to do. The very best conversations I have with patients include lots of questions – particularly important for those who are considering an elective procedure such as LASIK. I decided I wanted to write about the top questions I want you to ask me about LASIK. Here are the first five:

 

How safe is LASIK?

The safety of LASIK is proven by a tremendous amount of scientific evidence gathered by hundreds of clinical researchers. Based upon all this data, and it has one of the largest data sets ever compiled concerning a medical procedure, that LASIK is considered extremely safe.

 

Am I a good candidate and if so why?

This should be determined by a thorough evaluation of your vision and eyes in a comprehensive consultation with your LASIK surgeon. Being a good physical candidate is important, but it is also necessary to include your personality and lifestyle in making the decision to move forward.

 

What are the chances I will obtain the vision I desire?

As with the data supporting the safety of LASIK, there is a vast amount of research supporting the effectiveness of the procedure. The latest lasers and diagnostic technologies have further refined the performance of LASIK to deliver visual outcomes that are better than ever with more than 95 percent of patients achieving 20/20 vision and nearly 100 percent of patients achieving at least 20/40. The most recent review of the LASIK research worldwide shows that more than 96 percent of patients are satisfied with their vision.

 

Will I need to ever wear glasses again in the future?

Most patients no longer need to rely on glasses or contacts, and the ones that do see their dependence on corrective eyewear drastically reduced. While the results from LASIK surgery are considered to be permanent, you will still be susceptible to age-related eye conditions such as presbyopia and cataracts. Should you develop one of these conditions, you may need to use reading glasses or additional treatment.

 

What can I do to improve my results prior to, during, and following the procedure?

Having a thorough understanding of the procedure, what to expect during the recovery and carefully following the post-operative medication and activity regimen are all essential to a successful outcome.

 

When can I go back to doing normal activities?

Typically, patients return to work the next day and are back to their normal routine within a week or two.

 

We strongly recommend, once you’ve had a thorough LASIK evaluation and it is determined you are a good or even excellent candidate for LASIK, you get information from a variety of sources. We are here to answer your questions and want to help you with this decision in any way we can. We also understand the need to do some independent research. In addition to talking with your friends and family who have had LASIK, the American Refractive Surgery Council offers a lot of information about vision correction procedures and is a good resource.

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Do You Love Your Contacts as Much as You Used Too?

A Japanese woman puts in a contact lens.

Let’s face it, most people who wear contact lenses have a love-hate relationship with them.

Ah…the exhilaration of that first pair of contact lenses when for the first time you, who have known the struggle with glasses, are able to see without anyone knowing that, in reality, you can’t. But, that sense of freedom can be fleeting once you realize that contacts, too, have limitations. And, for many, the disappointment sets in when signs of contact lens intolerance appear. It begins with a slight irritation or dry eye; but over time, it can become a sight-threatening issue.

What is contact lens intolerance?

Contact lens intolerance happens when a person’s eyes get irritated when they put in their contacts – becoming bothersome enough that they want to take them out and stop wearing them. Symptoms can be temporary and range from a mild gritty or stinging sensation to more serious issues such as chronic dry eye, abrasions, infections and even corneal ulcers. And for some, these complications are sight-threatening – for up to 1 in 500 contact lens users per year – according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, citing a study published in 2008.

What causes contact lens intolerance?

There are several possible factors. It could be that the fit isn’t right. Perhaps age or hormone changes are contributing factors.  Certainly the over-wearing of lenses and the resulting deposits developing on the surface of the lens is as issue, as is not cleaning lenses properly, or sensitivity to lens cleaning solutions; all are associated with the spectrum of symptoms in contact lens intolerance. Whatever the cause, people with contact lens intolerance are better off looking for alternative solutions, such as switching to glasses or having LASIK eye surgery to correct their vision permanently without needing corrective lenses of any type.

Even people who don’t suffer from contact lens intolerance eventually find that the appeal of contacts begins to fade. All types of contact lenses reduce the amount of oxygen reaching the cornea – the front of the eye where the contact resides.  Even with proper care and meticulous hygiene, this can lead to an increased risk of eye problems.

A recently published study of long-term (<5 years) contact lens users showed that, over a 3-year period, their level of satisfaction with using contact lenses decreased significantly: from 63 percent down to 54 percent. The study also showed that people who used to use contacts, but then chose to have LASIK eye surgery, had a much higher level of satisfaction with their vision that only improved over time.  Importantly, LASIK has a much lower risk of sight threatening infection – 1 in 10,000 according to clinical research.

If you wear contacts and experience symptoms such as red, irritated eyes, ongoing dry eye symptoms, pain or swelling, it’s vital you don’t ignore any of these symptoms. To protect the health of your eyes and vision, please schedule a consultation with Dr. Donnenfeld at Long Island LASIK immediately as you may be contact lens intolerant. It may be time for you to consider other forms of vision correction, such as LASIK.

 

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